Friday, August 31, 2012

Book Review of Quidditch Through the Ages by Kenilworthy Whisp (J.K Rowling)

Name of Book: Quidditch Through the Ages

Author: Kennilworthy Whisp (JK Rowling)

ISBN: 0-439-29502-5

Publisher: Scholastic

Part of a Series: Harry Potter

Type of book: History, Quidditch, magic, Harry Potter

Year it was published: 2001

Summary: 

If you have ever asked yourself where the Golden Snitch came from, how the Bludgers came into existence, or why the Wigtown Wanderers have pictures of meat cleavers on their robes, you need Quidditch Through the Ages. This limited edition is a copy of the volume in Hogwarts School Library, where it is consulted by young Quidditch fans on an almost daily basis.

Proceeds from the sale of this book will go to improving and saving the lives of children around the world- work that is even more important and astonishing than the three-and-a-half-second capture of the Golden Snitch by Roderick Plumpton in 1921.

Albus Dumbledore

Characters:

There aren't any characters in the book, just a general version of Quidditch history.

Theme:

A lot of incidents make up the modern version.

Plot:

There is no plot sorry to say. The focus is on Quidditch and how it evolved into the game that's covered in Harry Potter novels.

Author Information:
(from goodreads.com)

Kennilworthy is a renowned Quidditch expert (and, he says, fanatic.) He is the author of many Quidditch-related works, including The Wonder of Wigtown Wanderers, He Flew like a Madman (a biography of "Dangerous" Dai Llwellyn) and Beating the Bludgers- A study of Defensive Strategies in Quidditch.

Kennilworthy Whisp divides his time between his home in Nottinghamshire and "wherever Wigtown Wanderers are playing this week." His hobbies include backgammon, vegetarian cookery, and collecting vintage broomsticks.

born
July 31, 1965 in Yate, South Gloucestershire, England, The United Kingdom

gender
female

website
http://www.jkrowling.com

twitter username
jk_rowling

genre
Literature & Fiction, Young Adult, Science Fiction & Fantasy

influences
Jane Austen, Geoffrey Chaucer, Oscar Wilde, Elizabeth Goudge, C.S. Lew...more


About this author
edit data

J.K. Rowling (Joanne "Jo" Rowling) is the writer behind the best selling Harry Potter series. The Potter books have gained worldwide attention, won multiple awards, sold more than 400 million copies and been the basis for a popular series of films.

Aside from writing the Potter novels, Rowling is perhaps equally famous for her "rags to riches" life story, in which she progressed from living on benefits to multi-millionaire status within five years. The 2008 Sunday Times Rich List estimated Rowling's fortune at £560 million ($798 million), ranking her as the twelfth richest woman in Britain. Forbes ranked Rowling as the forty-eighth most powerful celebrity of 2007, and Time magazine named her as a runner-up for its 2007 Person of the Year, noting the social, moral, and political inspiration she has given her fandom. She has become a notable philanthropist, supporting such charities as Comic Relief, One Parent Families, Multiple Sclerosis Society of Great Britain, and the Children's High Level Group. Rowling's mother died of multiple sclerosis, and because of this she became severely depressed for a period of time.

Real people are the basis for her characters, including one of her most famous, Gilderoy Lockhart, though she refuses to say on whom he is based.

Harry Potter is her most famous debut, though she has written other books branching off of Potter, including The Tales of Beedle the Bard, Quidditch through the Ages, and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find them.

Rowling has millions of fans and is a household name all around the world, so if you write her a letter, don't expect her to answer it. Please note that she doesn't have an email address.

Opinion:

This could be called a companion to Harry Potter novels. I found it enjoyable and interesting. This book talks about various broomsticks that are used for Quidditch, how the game evolved, rules, British teams, its popularity in different nations, fouls and so forth. I don't think this book explains how the game is played, although it does talk about various positions and so forth. I would guess that Quidditch is the Wizard European version of soccer because for America she talks about Quodpot which sounds like American football.

4 out of 5
(0: Stay away unless a masochist 1: Good for insomnia 2: Horrible but readable; 3: Readable and quickly forgettable, 4: Good, enjoyable 5: Buy it, keep it and never let it go.)

No comments:

Post a Comment

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...