Saturday, September 29, 2012

E-Reading: Book Review of #1 Savage Ecstasy by Janelle Taylor

Name of Book: Savage Ecstasy

Author: Janelle Taylor

ISBN: 9780821754535

Publisher: Zebra books

Part of a Series: Gray Eagle series

Type of book: 1776, inaccurate, cliffhanger, Native American male/English female, way of life, stereotypical, ultimate alpha male, romance, adult, savage, missing right and left hemispheres of the brain, animalistic

Year it was published: 1981

Summary:

It was like lightning striking, the first time they looked into each other's eyes: Gray Eagle, the captured Indian brave, and Alisha, the beautiful young settler. As the proud Oglala warrior was being tortured by his white captors, only Alisha seemed to notice that he was a human being-handsome and strong, and one who took her breath away.

Characters:

The only character that I did like for some odd reason was the half Native American-half white one. I personally wanted to kill both Alisha and Gray Eagle for their ridiculousness. Alisa is the epitome of being ridiculous; she's giving, warm, receptive and helpful. (If you forget that, don't worry, in every other page the men will remind you how she's like a helpless doe and they want to either protect her or ravish her or both.) She laughs at squirrels, runs with butterflies, has a mindset of a 21st century woman rather than someone who was truly born in 1700s. She also flies over rainbows on her unicorn...oh wait, the unicorn part doesn't happen. Gray Eagle is polar opposite to everything Alisha is. He upholds honor and pride above everything else, he's not patient (Ms. Taylor, if you show him at more impatient and violent stages rather than at calm, I do wonder how leadership and everything else is won by him.) He reminds me of a violent animal that doesn't think but constantly acts and goes crazy. He's also crazy and never takes anyone's advice, not even his best friend's.

Theme:

(sarcasm:) Through violence and rapes you can fall in love. Yay for Twilight and Fifty Shades of Gray!

Plot:

For some odd reason I thought at first this had Mystery of Udolpho feel to it, but then it quickly wore off. (Mystery of Udolpho was written in 1790s...) I think its because of nature and the helpless female idea is where it came from. Mysteries of Udolpho never had me frustrated and irritated with the characters, and the good male characters never did anything horrible to Emily and always tried to help her. The hero, Valancourt, really seemed right for the heroine for both traveled and there was love and affection from both sides. I never once skipped paragraphs but read this book completely through. This book, even writing wise, was a nightmare to read through. The chapters were way too long (on my e-reader they would be about 40-50 pages long, and I can't leave a chapter unfinished.) There is also pointless background details about characters that die off very soon, and too much back story is revealed; I also wished that the reasons for punishments and whatnot would have been revealed with Gray Eagle instead of by a character at the very end of the novel. As if that's not enough, there are constant sometimes mid-paragraph switches of points of views by different characters. You have Alisha's thoughts then all of a sudden the author would jump to Gray Eagle or White Arrow or to another character about how delicate and frail Alisha is and how much they love her. I can't believe I'll say this, but reading this book is even worse than reading Twilight. Its not a pleasant reading experience and if there's an enemy or someone you hate, giving this book as a gift will be the perfect revenge.

Author Information:
(from goodreads.com)

born
June 28, 1944 in Athens, Georgia, The United States

gender
female

website
http://www.janelletaylor.com/


About this author

The legendary Janelle Taylor was born on June 28, 1944 in Athens, GA. In 1965, she married Michael Taylor with whom she had two children, Angela Taylor-MacIntyre and Alisha Taylor Thurmond. Ms. Taylor attended the Medical College of Georgia from 1977 to 1979 and Augusta State University from 1980-1981. She withdrew from the latter after she sold her first two novels. Today, she is the author of thirty-nine novels, three novellas, and many contributions to other collections. There are thirty-nine million copies of her works in print worldwide and she has made The New York Times Bestseller List eight times. Ms. Taylor's works have also been featured ten times on the "1 million +" bestseller's list at Publisher's Weekly.

Some of Ms. Taylor's most recent books include By Candlelight, Someday Soon, Lakota Dawn, and Lakota Winds (due out in paperback in May 1999). She has also made contributions to other books including The Leukemia Society Cookbook, Christmas Rendezvous, and Summer Love. In addition, readers can see her as co-host of the QVC/TV Romance Book Club Show.

Ms. Taylor's interests include collecting spoons, coins from around the world, ship models, dolls, and old books. She loves to fish, ride horses, play chess, target-shoot, travel (especially in her motorhome and out West), hunt for Indian relics, and take long walks with her husband. Reading, in particular books set before 1900 and current Biographies, Thrillers, Horror, or Fantasy novels, is also one of Ms. Taylor's favorite activities. She is also extremely active with charity work and was even featured on the cover of Diabetes Forecast in February of 1998.

She lives in the country on seventy-nine acres of woods and pasture with a lake and a catfish pond. She writes her novels in a Spanish cottage which overlooks a five-acre lake, a working water mill, gazebo, and covered bridge.

Opinion:

How in Nine Hells did this book get published?! I doubt I have enough time to describe how brain numbing and ridiculous it became! Somehow it should be relegated to a different genre of romance because it's not that even. It ends with a cliffhanger; the hero continuously creates punishments and refuses to give reasons for them; he forces the heroine to sleep with him, and it was neither loving nor gentle; he breaks her hands, her whips her, he cracks her knuckles, in order to win her over he asks his friend to "pretend" to want to rape her! What a great hero we have in that book! All that time he wonders why she doesn't have any affection for him. Gee, I don't know, could it be because you continuously raped her and came up with weird punishments for her? The hero seems to lack a normal human brain and instead the part that's left is very animal. The heroine herself drove me nuts; everybody fell in love with her; she was kissed and almost raped multiple times; she wasn't unrealistic; (in my mind I kept picturing a woman with triple d breasts that swing back and forth like pendulous bells across her stomach, don't know why.) she's also an orphan and a ridiculously giving soul. Also, she somehow fell in love with the man who inflicted such savage brutality on her. (I guess if I hated this type of book that much, I should really stay away from Fifty Shades of Grey...) This is just the tip of the iceberg, by the way. Historically the book wasn't accurate, it also had racist language in it: the Native American men were constantly called braves, and whites constantly called them Injuns. I think the author wrote this more for the shock value rather than education. As far as I know, showering or bathing wasn't popular in 1600s, and I doubt that in 1776 bathing and showering was very popular, and excuse me, a shampoo? They had shampoos back then?! (I googled and let's say earliest was 1904!) Wasn't there also an American Revolution going on, which began in 1775? I would think that earliest pioneering was in late 1700s, maybe closer to 1800s, instead of at the time of troubles with England and colonies! Also, she is English! Isn't the author aware of the animosity between the French and English? Why would an Englishwoman newly arrived to the colonies bother begging help from the French? English kept themselves separate from the Indians; the French on the hand tried to fit in with the land while English imposed their will on everything! Please do some research Ms. Taylor! Again, this is the tip of the iceberg of what I found wrong with the book. I don't know much about lifestyles of the Native American tribes, but I doubt that they'd be so disrespectful towards women the way that Satan-err I mean Gray Eagle is. I thought in a Native American culture the woman rules the home and so forth instead of the men. Weren't women accorded more respect in Native American culture rather than European cultures at the time? The author has done a great disservice by writing and publishing such a travesty of the novel. She has stereotyped and placed Native American men in a bad light; she is not historically accurate even about the simplest things that you could learn in elementary school! And she gives men as well as women a horrible image and reinforces the idea that you could find "true" love through violence and rape.

0 out of 5
(0: Stay away unless a masochist 1: Good for insomnia 2: Horrible but readable; 3: Readable and quickly forgettable, 4: Good, enjoyable 5: Buy it, keep it and never let it go.)

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

Book Challenge A-Z #42 Chenxi and the Foreigner by Sally Rippin

Fulfilling the requirement:

The X letter for the title alphabetically.

Summary:

When Anna travels to Shanghai to study traditional Chinese painting, she's determined to immerse herself in the local culture- unlike her businessman father, who sticks to a community of Westerners. As an innocent new arrival, Anna spends time with Chenxi, the good-looking and aloof classmate who is her student guide, and is soon forced to recognize that it's much harder to escape being a wai guo ren- a foreigner- than she expected. WHen she unwittingly draws the attention of officials to Chenxi and his radical artist friends, she must face the terrible price of her actions. A deeply felt love story filled with raw emotion, cultural collisions, and memorable characters, Chenxi and the Foreigner offers an unrestrained look at hte limits on freedom in the repressive atmosphere of 1980s China.

Lesson learned:

Its possible to be independent.

Link to review: click here

Book Challenge A-Z #41 Great Illustrated Classics The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling

Fulfilling the requirement:

The K letter for the author's last name alphabetically.

Summary:

Reared by wolves in the jungle, Mowgli sometimes hunts with the animals and sometimes is hunted by them! He must face unfriendly ones on his own- like the chattering army of monkeys who kidnap him to their tree-top home; the ever-hungry tiger, Shere Khan; even his own kind, Man- and learn to live by the law of the jungle.

These wonderful stories, each one more exciting than the last, can be read time and again for thrills, adventure, and endless insight into people and animals and their relationship.

Lesson learned:

There's laws everywhere, even in jungle.

Link to review: click here

Planed Books

Books I'm Reading:
Pride and Prejudice- Jane Austen 223/326
The Song of the Lark- Willa Cather 188/417
The Music of Dolphins- Karen Hesse 10/181
Prey- Lurlene McDaniel 14/194
Bridge of Scarlet Leaves- Kristina Yoshida McMorris 14/421
Witch- Christopher Pike 90/225
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them- Newt Scamander (JK Rowling) x/42
Heavy Sand- Anatoli Rybakov 121/381
Ivanhoe- Sir Walter Scott 85/405
Anna Karenina- Leo Tolstoy 136/807

Series:
The Story of the Stone- Xueqin Cao
5. The Dreamer Wakes 96/376
People Series Quartet- W. Michael Gear and Kathleen O'Neal Gear
3. People of the Earth 171/587
The Storyteller Trilogy- Sue Harrison
2. Cry of the Wind 184/474
The Angels Trilogy- Lurlene McDaniel
3. Until Angels Close My Eyes 383/552
Harry Potter- JK Rowling
1. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone 31/309
Dragonlance Chronicles- Margaret Weis, Tracy Hickman
1. Dragons of Autumn Twilight 45/445
Millicent Min Trilogy- Lisa Yee
3. So Totally Emily Ebers 7/280

E-Reading:
Savage Series- Jannelle Taylor
1. Savage Ecstasy 128/711

Future Books:
Northanger Abbey- Jane Austen
My Antonia- Willa Cather
Dracula- Bram Stoker

Series:
Uniformly Hot- Karen Foley
1. Coming Up For Air
2. No Going Back
People Series Quartet- W. Michael Gear and Kathleen O'Neal Gear
4. People of the River
The Storyteller Trilogy- Sue Harrison
3. Call Down the Stars
Harry Potter- JK Rowling
2. Harry Potter and Chamber of Secrets
3. Harry Potter and Prisoner of Azkaban
4. Harry Potter and goblet of fire
Dragonlance Chronicles- Margaret Weis, Tracy Hickman
2. Dragons of Winter Nights
3. Dragons of Spring Dawning
Dragonlance Legends- Margaret Weis, Tracy Hickman
1. Time of the Twins
2. War of the Twins
3. Test of the Twins

E-Reading series:
Flirting with Justice- Wendy Etherington
2. Breathless on the Beach (paperback)
3. Undone By Moonlight
The Blackfoot Warriors- Karen Kay
2. White Eagle's Touch
3. Night Thunder's Bride
The Nancy Drew Series-Carolyn Keene
4. The Mystery at Lilac Inn
5. The Secret of Shadow Ranch
6. The Secret of the Red Gate Farm
7. The Clue in the Diary
8. Nancy's Mysterious Letter
9. The Sign of the Twisted Candles
10. Password to Larkspur Lane
11. The clue of the broken locket
12. the message in the hollow oak
13. the mystery of the ivory charm
14. the whispering statue
15. the haunted bridge
16. the clue of the tapping heels
17. Mystery of the Brass Bound Trunk
18. Mystery of hte Moss covered Mansion
19. the quest of the missing map
20. the clue in the jewel box
21. the secret in the old attic
22. the clue in the crumbling wall
23. mystery of the tolling bell tower
24. the clue in the old album
25. the ghost of blackwood hall
26. the clue if the leaning chimney
27. the secret of the wooden lady
28. the clue of the black keys
29. mystery at the ski jump
30. the clue of the velvet mask
31. the ringmaster's secret
32. the scarlet slipper mystery
33. the witch tree symbol
34. the hidden window mystery
35. the haunted showboat
36. the secret of the golden pavilion
37. the clue in the old stagecoach
38. the mystery of the fire dragon
39. the clue of the dancing puppet
40. the moonstone castle mystery
41. the clue of the whistling bagpipes
42. the phantom of pine hill
43. the mystery of the 99 steps
44. the clue in the crossword cipher
45. the spider sapphire mystery
46. the invisible intruder
47. the mysterious mannequin
48. the crooked banister
49. the secret of mirror bay
50. the double jinx mystery
51. mystery of the glowing eye
52. the secret of the forgotten city
53. the sky pavilion
54. the strange message in the parchment
55. mystery of the crocodile island
56. the thirteenth pearl
Forbidden Fantasies Trilogy- Cara Summers
2. No Holds Barred (Paperback copy)
Ecstasy Series- Janelle Taylor
2. Defiant Ecstasy
3. Forbidden Ecstasy
4. Brazen Ecstasy
5. Tender Ecstasy
6. Stolen Ecstasy
7. Bittersweet Ecstasy
8. Forever Ecstasy
9. Savage Conquest
Sons of Chance- Vicki Lewis Thompson
2. Ambushed
3. Claimed
4. Should've been a cowboy
5. Cowboy Up
6. Cowboys Like Us
6a. Merry Christmas Baby
6b. Already home
7. Long Road home (paper back copy)
8. Lead Me Home (paper back copy)
9. Feels Like Home (paper back copy)

Yom Kippur

For those who are celebrating Yom Kippur tonight. May you find what you are seeking for.

Book Review of Vampire of the Mists by Christie Golden

Name of Book: Vampire of the Mists

Author: Christie Golden

ISBN: 1-56076-155-5

Publisher: TSR

Type of book: vampire, Barovia, Forgotten Realms, elf, betrayal, mystery, horror, fantasy, sun, future, gypsies, Gothic, castle

Year it was published: 1991

Summary:

BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU WISH FOR --- THE DARK POWERS OF RAVENLOFT MIGHT HEAR YOU.

Jander Sunstar is a gold elf, a native of magical Evermeet in the Forgotten Realms. He is also a five-hundred-year-old vampire.

Torn by rage and grief, Jander is transported into the nightmare realm of Ravenloft, where he gains the attention of the demiplane's master, Count Strand Von Zarovich. But can Jander trust this elegant fellow vampire once he discovers that his own quest for revenge is linked to the dark heritage of the count's domain?

Characters:

The characters are well developed as well as rounded, despite them being two dimensional. The good characters are good while evil ones are evil and the passage of years doesn't seem to change anything about them personality wise. Jander is best described as a sad melancholy elf who hates being what he is and stands out from Barovia in color and whatnot; Strahd Von Zarovich could best be described as Count Dracula, except he is far more human and despite his deeds, one will feel sorry for him when they will read his back story. The other characters of Sasha, Leisl, Katya, Anastasia and so forth are basically been there but then quickly they pass away from sight (aside from Leisl, Sasha and Katya.) I would have liked to see more of the chemistry between Sasha and Leisl but I don't see the chemistry there.

Theme:

Remain true to yourself and your heart.

Plot:

Although at first the plot didn't grab me, from the first chapter it became exciting and painful as we see Jander's love for the madwoman Anna, his vow of revenge and him being taken to Barovia where he meets Strahd Von Zarovich and learns of the sad fate. The ending itself is an open ending and could be interpreted either way, although I do hope that if Jander does die, he dies peacefully as he deserves instead of violently. The story does change points of views briefly, although the primary characters are that of Jander and Sasha and Leisl to an extent. Towards the end Strahd's point of view is seen. I wish more books could have been written about Jander but I have to be content with what I have.

Author Information:
(from goodreads.com)
born
November 21, 1963 in Atlanta Georgia, The United States

gender
female

website
http://www.christiegolden.com/

genre
Science Fiction & Fantasy, Horror


About this author

Award-winning author Christie Golden has written over thirty novels and several short stories in the fields of science fiction, fantasy and horror. She has over a million books in print.

2009 will see no fewer than three novels published. First out in late April will be a World of Warcraft novel, Athas: Rise of the Lich King. This is the first Warcraft novel to appear in hardcover. Fans of the young paladin who fell so far from grace will get to read his definitive story.

In June, Golden’s first Star Wars novel, also a hardcover, sees print. Star Wars: Fate of the Jedi—Omen is the second in a nine-book series she is co-authoring with Aaron Allston and Troy Denning. Also in June comes the conclusion of Golden’s StarCraft: The Dark Templar Saga with the release of Twlight, the third book in the series. The first two are Firstborn and Shadow Hunters.

2004 saw the launch of an original fantasy series called The Final Dance, from LUNA Books. The first novel in the series, On Fire's Wings, was published in July of that year. The second, In Stone’s Clasp , came out in September of 2005. With In Stone’s Clasp, Golden won the Colorado Author’s League Top Hand Award for Best Genre Novel for the second time. The third book, Under Sea’s Shadow, is available only as an e-book

Golden is also the author of two original fantasy novels from Ace Books, King's Man and Thief and Instrument of Fate, which made the 1996 Nebula Preliminary Ballot. Under the pen name of Jadrien Bell, she wrote a historical fantasy thriller entitled A.D. 999, which won the Colorado Author's League Top Hand Award for Best Genre Novel of 1999.

Golden launched the TSR Ravenloft line in 1991 with her first novel, the highly successful Vampire of the Mists , which introduced elven vampire Jander Sunstar. Golden followed up Vampire with Dance of the Dead and The Enemy Within . In September of 2006, fifteen years to the month, The Ravenloft Covenant: Vampire of the Mists enabled Jander Sunstar to reach a whole new audience.

Other projects include a slew of Star Trek novels, among them The Murdered Sun , Marooned , and Seven of Nine , and "The Dark Matters Trilogy," Cloak and Dagger , Ghost Dance and Shadow of Heaven .

The Voyager novel relaunch, which includes Homecoming and The Farther Shore , were bestsellers and were the fastest-selling Trek novels of 2003. Golden continued writing VOYAGER novels even though the show went off the air, and enjoyed exploring the creative freedom that gave her in the two-parter called Spirit Walk, which includes Old Wounds and Enemy of my Enemy .

Golden has also written the novelization of Steven Spielberg's Invasion America and an original "prequel," On The Run , both of which received high praise from producer Harve Bennett. On The Run, a combination medical thriller and science fiction adventure, even prompted Bennett to invite Golden to assist in crafting the second season of the show, if it was renewed.

Golden lives in Loveland, Colorado, with her artist husband and their two cats.

Opinion:

In the past I have read this book multiple times, somehow falling in love with the idea of Jander Sunstar; a golden haired melancholy elf who happens to be a vampire. I think I knew of him and was looking for some books about him and this is the only one I could find. Even almost ten years later I enjoyed reading the novel and could appreciate it more. This is apparently a rare moment that the book hadn't aged and was still enjoyable. Fun thing is that Ms. Golden seems to adapt Russian names as well as the middle names from Russia: (ex: Sasha Petrovich is Alexei Petrovich, Petrovich from Petya who is Sasha's father.) Also, for fun, this is the way I imagine Jander would look like: The picture was not drawn by me and I got it from this website: http://donaruie.deviantart.com/art/RP-Jander-Sunstar-14131620



4 out of 5
(0: Stay away unless a masochist 1: Good for insomnia 2: Horrible but readable; 3: Readable and quickly forgettable, 4: Good, enjoyable 5: Buy it, keep it and never let it go.)

Book Review of Traitors by Kirstine Kathryn Rusch

Name of Book: Traitors

Author: Kristine Kathryn Rusch

ISBN: 0-451-45415-4

Publisher: RoC

Type of book: fantasy, revenge, persecution of creativity, Kingdom, Golga, police, rebellion, romance

Year it was published: 1993

Summary:

Emilio Diate has vowed vengeance on the Kingdom for the government's merciless execution of his entire family. Now forced to start over on the merchant island of Golga, where he knew  his dancing Talent would be forbidden, the handsome fugitive joins the secret police with only one dark intention- to stlak his family's killers and serve his own brand of justice.

But when love intercedes, Diate may become the victim of his own revenge. For Sheba, the woman who has stolen his heart, also wears the crown of queen in the Kingdom, and is the very person Diate has schemed to have assassinated. A treacherous scheme that may end his one true chance at happiness- and spell the end of the universe.

Characters:

I want to say that the characters might be described as rounded but I won't. While they seem to be three dimensional, they're not. I was confused by Diate's transformation at the end which took away my enjoyment and didn't understand why he supports what he once hated. Sheba herself remained the same without any changes and explanations that were given aren't enough to understand why things happened the way they did. Also, its not explained why or how Diate's family are tied to Kingdom's fate.

Theme:

I have no idea what I should have learned from the book. What you once hate you will learn to love?

Plot:

The story is completely from Diate's point of view in third person . Up until the end I understood what was going on and also understood Diate's motives and thoughts and so forth. I did wish that more about the world would have been revealed.

Author Information:

Kristine Kathryn Rusch has received countless Nebula, Hugo, and Stoker nominations for her short fiction. She has won the World Fantasy Award and the John W. Campbell Award, and is the editor of the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. Her previous novels include Heart Readers and The White Mists of Power. She lives in Eugene, Oregon.

Opinion:

This is actually my second reading of the book, and just like the first time it wasn't memorable and I didn't enjoy it. It seems to have the right ingredients but towards the end the book is messed up and I couldn't understand the things I should have. Up until the end I would have given it four stars, but the end convinced me to stick with three stars. I did understand that a certain woman used the hero and so forth, but I didn't understand why Diate was seeking certain people and what he truly wanted from them. Politics in this book have really escaped me. I also would have wished happy endings for Diate's friend.

3 out of 5
(0: Stay away unless a masochist 1: Good for insomnia 2: Horrible but readable; 3: Readable and quickly forgettable, 4: Good, enjoyable 5: Buy it, keep it and never let it go.)

E-Reading: Book Review of #1 Wanted! by Vicki Lewis Thompson

Name of Book: Wanted!

Author: Vicki Lewis Thompson

ISBN:  9780373795482

Publisher: Harlequin Blaze

Part of a Series: Sons of Chance

Type of book: Romance, 1937, 2010, secrets, deception, photography, ranching life, cowboys, struggle, romance, adult

Year it was published: 2010

Summary:

Photographer Dominique Jeffries has come to Wyoming to find herself -- her creative self, her sexual self. After escaping the engagement from hell, she's dying to break loose and live a little. And seducing a shirtless, sweaty cowhand looks like just the place to start.

Nick Chance isn't exactly a cowhand but, hey, he'll be whatever the lady wants! Only he soon realizes that this is more than just a quick roll in the hay. There's something about Dominique that calls to him, something about her that completes him.

There's only one problem. Dominique wants a fling, not another relationship.

Little does she guess how easily she'll be persuaded to take a Chance -- again and again and again!

Characters:

The characters are well rounded and are believable. Dominique struggles and debates with the idea of impulsiveness vs stability, while Nick struggles with a secret that everyone but he knows about. The secondary characters as well as secondary romance between Pam and Emmett seems to be well done and I do hope of seeing more of Pam and Emmet in the future books. Just like Dominique, I quickly got annoyed with her former ex and his view of life that fun is not allowed at all.

Theme:

Taking a chance can be worth it.

Plot:

Although the story is easy to follow, I felt that the ending was tied up too neatly and seem to have fallen into place neatly as well. I did enjoy the chemistry and whatnot between Nick and Dominique as well as the scenes between Nick and Jack (my favorites, despite them fighting.) I would like to know why Jack is the way he is and hope my question will be answered.

Author Information:
(from goodreads.com)

url
http://www.goodreads.com/VickiLewisThompson

gender
female

website
http://www.vickilewisthompson.com/

genre
Literature & Fiction, Romance, Humor

member since
February 2009


About this author

New York Times and USA Today bestseller Vicki Lewis Thompson believes love makes the world go around and laughter makes the trip worth taking. The recipient of RWA’s Nora Roberts Lifetime Achievement Award and the author of more than ninety books, Vicki pioneered a new kind of romance hero with Nerd in Shining Armor. Following the success of her nerd stories, Vicki launched a boisterous paranormal series featuring a matchmaking witch and wizard, an ADD dragon named George, and a black cat inspired by her own precocious feline, Eve.

Opinion:

I was really impressed with this book: well written, strong and believable characters and nothing for me to pick on. I think it had the right amount of focus on the heroine and hero as well as their problems and their struggles. I really can't find anything to complain about when it comes to the book. The only thing I might ask and hope for is that in the future novels there will be a focus on why Jack is the way he is. (A love gone awry one wonders?) There is a mystery there as to why certain secret was not revealed immediately but the character who should answer that is dead in the book. Other than that it flows realistically and I often felt deeply for the heroine who has to learn to have fun and let go.

4 out of 5
(0: Stay away unless a masochist 1: Good for insomnia 2: Horrible but readable; 3: Readable and quickly forgettable, 4: Good, enjoyable 5: Buy it, keep it and never let it go.)

E-Reading: Book Review of #3 The Bungalow Mystery by Carolyn Keene

Name of Book: The Bungalow Mystery

Author: Carolyn Keene

ISBN: 9780448095035

Publisher: Gross and Dunlap

Part of a Series: Nancy Drew series

Type of book: Mystery, death, guardians, 1900s, bank fraud, young adult, feminism, detective, River Heights

Year it was published: 1930

Summary:

While trying to help a friend out of a difficulty, Nancy has a perilous experience in and around a deserted bungalow, from which only her bravery and quick thinking save her.

Characters:

In goodreads reviews, there is a description of Laura being horrified by doing housework. Unfortunately I might have missed this scene in the book. The book is more of tell rather than show and tell variety. Multiple times I am told to hate a character simply because the woman had a terrible experience of having a flat tire and so forth. I actually sympathized with her instead of hating her. There is also a very negative attitude towards actors (oh how times change!) Nancy is very independent and turns down the date just to solve the mystery. And just like in previous novels she's giving and so forth. Neither the cousins Bess and George show up, and neither does Ned nor Bess and George's boyfriends.

Theme:

Its possible to be independent.

Plot:

It's written in third person narrative completely from Nancy's point of view.  Despite the exciting start, I found this novel to be boring.I think anybody reading this will understand it quickly which is good, but its obvious that this isn't a modern book that will be liked by me. Today there are young adult novels written that can be enjoyed by people above the age limit as well as by teens themselves, I hope. While the book can be seen as classic for children, (it was published in 1930s and in just 18 years it will be 100 years since the books started to come out,) it might not be considered a classic for me.

Author Information:
from goodreads.com)

genre
Children's Books, Mystery & Thrillers

About this author

Carolyn Keene is a writer pen name that was used by many different people- both men and women- over the years. The company that was the creator of the Nancy Drew series, the Stratemeyer Syndicate, hired a variety of writers. For Nancy Drew, the writers used the pseudonym Carolyn Keene to assure anonymity of the creator.

Edna and Harriet Stratemeyer inherited the company from their father Edward Stratemeyer. Edna contributed 10 plot outlines before passing the reins to her sister Harriet. It was Mildred A. Wirt Benson, who breathed such a feisty spirit into Nancy's character. Mildred wrote 23 of the original 30 Nancy Drew Mystery Stories®, including the first three. It was her characterization that helped make Nancy an instant hit. The Stratemeyer Syndicate's devotion to the series over the years under the reins of Harriet Stratemeyer Adams helped to keep the series alive and on store shelves for each succeeding generation of girls and boys. In 1959, Harriet, along with several writers, began a 25-year project to revise the earlier Carolyn Keene novels. The Nancy Drew books were condensed, racial stereotypes were removed, and the language was updated. In a few cases, outdated plots were completely rewritten.

Other writers of Nancy Drew volumes include Harriet herself, she wrote most of the series after Mildred quit writing for the Syndicate and in 1959 began a revision of the first 34 texts. The role of the writer of "Carolyn Keene" passed temporarily to Walter Karig who wrote three novels during the Great Depression. Also contributing to Nancy Drew's prolific existence were Leslie McFarlane, James Duncan Lawrence, Nancy Axelrod, Priscilla Doll, Charles Strong, Alma Sasse, Wilhelmina Rankin, George Waller Jr., and Margaret Scherf.

Opinion:

Apparently the version I read came from 1950s rather than 1930s. I think there were too many exclamation marks and the whole story was transparent to me. Nancy's hair in this book is gold with reddish tints, which means we are getting closer and closer to when she becomes a redhead. I couldn't like or relate to any of the characters and unfortunately exclamation points added to my dislike which also caused me to roll eyes instead of saying "oh my god, got to know what happens next!" Nancy's friend from the previous book showed up in this one too. (Helen Corning, although she played a very brief role before permanently disappearing from the book. I don't know if she was in first book.) The reason I'm reading these books is that I've always wanted to read all Nancy Drew books fully, (56 original ones,) and now I can try to accomplish my goal.

3 out of 5
(0: Stay away unless a masochist 1: Good for insomnia 2: Horrible but readable; 3: Readable and quickly forgettable, 4: Good, enjoyable 5: Buy it, keep it and never let it go.)

Book Review of #1 Journey to Topaz by Yoshiko Uchida

Name of Book: Journey to Topaz

Author: Yoshiko Uchida

ISBN: 0-916870-85-5

Publisher: Creative Arts Book Company

Part of a Series: Journey Home sequel

Type of book: WW2, young adult, Topaz camp, Japanese-Americans, Issei, Nisei, camp conditions, desert, 1941-1942 or 1943?

Year it was published: 1971

Summary:

Like any eleven-year-old, Yuki Sakane is looking forward to christmas when her peaceful world is suddenly shattered by the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Father is taken by the FBI, and she, her mother and older brother, Ken, are uprooted from their home and shipped with thousands of West Coast Japanese Americans to the horse stalls of Tanforan Racetrack and then to the bleak desert concentration camp called Topaz.

There Yuki and her new friends, Emi and her grandparents, face terrifying dust storms, new hardships and finally a terrible tragedy that rocks the entire camp. Disillusioned, Ken must make a heart-wrenching decision, and Yuki faces another painful separation from her best friend as well as her brother.

Characters:

I don't think the author gives a heavy focus to the characters in this book. While they are there, they don't strike me as three dimensional with bad and good points but can be best described as good. The evil wasn't given a lot of attention to. Mostly the author focuses on Kenichi, Yuki's older brother and whatever changes Yuki is going through aren't given a lot of thought.

Theme:

Despite the evil there is always good.

Plot:

The story is from third person point of view. I'm not sure if its mostly from Yuki's eyes or if the author rotates from Yuki to Ken's points of views. It starts out on December 7th, 1941 and then stops around 1943 maybe, when Ken leaves to fight for freedom. I sensed a lot of pain written in the novel, and there also seemed to be a box of Pandora. (The author tries to open up about her family's experiences, but I don't think she succeeds in my opinion.) I wonder if she might be one of the first to write and talk about the Internment camps. Today more public is aware about them and its well known, while in '70s, I have doubts that it might have been known or talked about.

Author Information:
(from goodreads.com)

Yoshiko Uchida
Author profile

born
October 24, 1921 in Alameda, Cal., The United States

died
June 21, 1992

gender
female

genre
Literature & Fiction, Short Stories, Children's Books


About this author

Yoshiko, born on November 24, 1921, was the second daughter of Japanese immigrant parents Takashi and Iku. Her father worked as a businessman for Mitsui and Company in San Francisco, and Iku wrote poetry, passing along her love of literature to her girls. Though the Great Depression raged, the Uchida family enjoyed comforts because of Takashi's well-paying job and their own frugality. Yoshiko loved to write, and her stories played out on pieces of brown wrapping paper. She also kept a journal to record her thoughts and events.

Enveloped in love and tradition at home, Yoshiko weathered the prejudice she sometimes faced. Many white students at University High School in Oakland didn't invite her to their parties and wouldn't socialize with her, deeming her a foreigner. Even while attending the University of California at Berkley, Yoshiko often faced the same dilemma of being ostracized. She found friendships with other Japanese American students and was preparing to graduate when Pearl Harbor was bombed, changing her life.

The United States government rounded up 120,000 people of Japanese descent and put them into camps. The Uchida family first resided in a horse stall at a racetrack in California, surrounded by barbed wire and armed guards. Though difficult to endure, the next move was worse. Almost 8,000 Japanese were sent to a relocation concentration camp called Topaz in the Utah desert. The detainees suffered from violent dust storms, scorpions, snakes, and exceedingly poor living conditions. Yoshiko taught second grade children there until she received a fellowship from Smith College to earn a master's degree in education.

Yoshiko and her sister both left the camp in May of 1943, with their parents gaining release later that year. Teaching for several years in a Quaker school outside of Philadelphia, Yoshiko decided to quit teaching and find work that allowed more time for writing. She moved to New York City and began as a secretary, penning stories in the evenings. Asked to contribute to a book about Japanese folk tales, Yoshiko discovered that though the book didn't come to be, with time she could create a full collection of folk tales. Writing a few pieces for adults, Yoshiko realized she was better suited for children's books.

A Ford Foundation fellowship sent her to Japan to research the culture and their stories. Spending two years, Yoshiko found her time to be healing as she learned about her own ancestry. The pain of the concentration camps lessened, and she began writing about the experiences in fictional books such as Journey to Topaz and Journey Home. Her career as an author soared as people regarded her as a pioneer in Japanese American children's literature. The author of almost forty works, including Japanese folk tales and stories of Japanese American children making their way in the world, Yoshiko traveled extensively, lectured, and wrote. After suffering from a stroke, Yoshiko passed away on June 25, 1992, in Berkeley, California.

Opinion:

First of all this is a library copy of the book rather than something I own. While I liked reading it and found it interesting, my only problem with it is that I barely saw any family interactions prior to Pearl Harbor and during the camp days. The characters are more of told rather than see variety. Instead of going through a progression, the reader immediately has to deal with the changes in characters without comparing them previously to pre-Pearl Harbor. What I do admire about her writing is that she gives humanity and warmth to the Japanese in Internment Camps, and makes sure that the readers don't end up hating the Americans by portraying a lot of positive characters of American descent (Mrs. Jamieson, Mimi and her mother, the supposed contacts of Yuki's father.) The story itself isn't over and its best to get Journey Home if you want to know whether or not Ken will survive as well as other details.

4 out of 5
(0: Stay away unless a masochist 1: Good for insomnia 2: Horrible but readable; 3: Readable and quickly forgettable, 4: Good, enjoyable 5: Buy it, keep it and never let it go.)

Friday, September 21, 2012

Book Review of Great Illustrated Classics The Jungle Book By Rudyard Kipling

Name of Book: Great Illustrated Classics The Jungle Book

Author: Rudyard Kipling

ISBN: 978-0866119887

Publisher: Baronet Books

Type of book: Jungle, feral children, India, laws, animals, 1800s, man vs animal

Year it was published: 1895

Summary:

Reared by wolves in the jungle, Mowgli sometimes hunts with the animals and sometimes is hunted by them! He must face unfriendly ones on his own- like the chattering army of monkeys who kidnap him to their tree-top home; the ever-hungry tiger, Shere Khan; even his own kind, Man- and learn to live by the law of the jungle.

These wonderful stories, each one more exciting than the last, can be read time and again for thrills, adventure, and endless insight into people and animals and their relationship.

Characters:

In this version of Jungle Book the characters seemed to have very little depth although they did go through changes. Mowgli could be called as a God of the Jungle because with one mistake he seems to do no wrong in the jungle; Shere Khan is evil and that's it; they didn't feel like actual characters I could relate to.

Theme:

There is hope for all feral children. (Umm, not really. In my psychology class, the feral children never became normal and functioned as part of society.)

Plot:

The focus is on Mowgli's early life followed by skippage and then him finally leaving the jungle forever and trying to live as a human. I think I also might have detected some hints of  *ahem* possible racism that the editor tried to gloss over. (When Mowgli makes a choice to live in the house, one of the men from the village wants to kill him and his family; the village that his family wants to escape to is ruled by British who are fair...really? British really mistreated various races in the past...)

Author Information:
(from pages 4-5 in the book)

On December 30th, 1865, Rudyard Kipling was born to British parents in Bombay, India. His childhood wasn't especially happy, since he was raised by Indian nurses for his first six years, then taken to England to live with a foster family for the next five. He was then sent to boarding school, where he edited the newspaper and began writing.

At age seventeen, Kipling returned to India and spent seven years writing stories and poems for magazines. Many of these, as well as some of his later ones, were based on Indian folk tales told to him by his childhood nurses. Others, especially those involving animals, were influneced by Aesop's Fables and the Uncle Remus stories. Still others resulted from Kipling's living in ENgland and America, and his travels to Australia, Japan, and Africa.

Kipling's stories and poems for children were very popular. The fifteen stories of Mowgli and his animal friends who appear in The Jungle Book (1894) and The Second Jungle Book (1895) along with his Just SO Stories (1902), tell of wise and witty animals whose behavior is very human. They joke, boast, obey and disobey laws, get in trouble and get punished. But they also follow their own animal instincts in order to survive.

Novels, stories and poems centering around people added to Kipling's popularity. Kim (1905) tells the story of a poor orphan's life among the Indian natives. Captains Courageous (1897) centers around a rich American boy rescued from drowning by a family of New England fishermen. Kipling's most famous, "Gunga Din,", recounts the tale of a gallant Indian boy shot while carrying water to British soldiers.

During his lifetime and before his death in 1936, Rudyard Kipling published twelve volumes of short stories, five volumes of poems, and six novels. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1907.

Opinion:

While the story was fascinating and engaging, it was not complete. (I recall skimming through my Russian version of the book and there was mention of bad weather which this one didn't mention.) The details have been cut out and it was a bit dry. Also, the book sounded very much like the Disney version of The Jungle Book; the events are skimmed through and whatever impact they might have had is not well explored. This is a good start out if you're just looking for something general or to try out. If you're looking for something deeper with more details, I would advise to find another The Jungle Book.

4 out of 5
(0: Stay away unless a masochist 1: Good for insomnia 2: Horrible but readable; 3: Readable and quickly forgettable, 4: Good, enjoyable 5: Buy it, keep it and never let it go.)

Sunday, September 16, 2012

Happy New Years

Oh, today's not January 1st 2013. But happy Rosh Hashanah for those who celebrate it! :D

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Book Challenge A-Z #40 Quidditch Through the Ages by Kennilworthy Whisp (JK Rowling)

Fulfilling the requirement:

The letter Q for the title, alphabetically.

Summary:

If you have ever asked yourself where the Golden Snitch came from, how the Bludgers came into existence, or why the Wigtown Wanderers have pictures of meat cleavers on their robes, you need Quidditch Through the Ages. This limited edition is a copy of the volume in Hogwarts School Library, where it is consulted by young Quidditch fans on an almost daily basis.

Proceeds from the sale of this book will go to improving and saving the lives of children around the world- work that is even more important and astonishing than the three-and-a-half-second capture of the Golden Snitch by Roderick Plumpton in 1921.

Albus Dumbledore

Lesson learned:

To make something modern, make use of many incidents.

Link to review: click here

Book Challenge A-Z #39 Tess of the d'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy

Fulfilling the requirement:

The T letter for the title alphabetically.

Summary:

Violated by one man, forsaken by another, Tess Durbeyfield is the magnificent and spirited heroine of Thomas Hardy’s immortal work. Of all the great English novelists, no one writes more eloquently of tragic destiny than Hardy. With the innocent and powerless victim Tess, he creates profound sympathy for human frailty while passionately indicting the injustices of Victorian society. Scorned by outraged readers upon its publication in 1891, Tess of the d’Urbervilles is today one of the enduring classics of nineteenth-century literature.

Lesson learned:

There are double standards for men and women.

Link to review: click here

Book Challenge A-Z #38 The Red and the Black by Stendhal

Fulfilling the requirement:

The R Letter for the title alphabetically.

Summary:

Handsome and ambitious, Julien Sorel is determined to rise above his humble peasant origins and make something of his life-by adopting the code of hypocrisy by which his society operates. Julien ultimately commits a crime-out of passion, principle, or insanity-that will bring about his downfall. The Red and the Black is a lively, satirical picture of French Restoration society after Waterloo, riddled with corruption, greed, and ennui. The complex, sympathetic portrayal of Julien, the cold exploiter whose Machiavellian campaign is undercut by his own emotions, makes him Stendhal's most brilliant and human creation-and one of the greatest characters in European literature.

Lesson learned:

If you're on top, you're more likely to have enemies.

Link to review: click here

Book Challenge A-Z #37 The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

Fulfilling the requirement:

The T letter for the author's last name alphabetically.

Summary:

"In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit. Not a nasty, dirty, wet hole, filled with the ends of worms and an oozy smell, nor yet a dry, bare, sandy hole with nothing in it to sit down on or to eat: it was a hobbit-hole, and that means comfort."

The hobbit-hole in question belongs to one Bilbo Baggins, an upstanding member of a "little people, about half our height, and smaller than the bearded dwarves." He is, like most of his kind, well off, well fed, and best pleased when sitting by his own fire with a pipe, a glass of good beer, and a meal to look forward to. Certainly this particular hobbit is the last person one would expect to see set off on a hazardous journey; indeed, when Gandalf the Grey stops by one morning, "looking for someone to share in an adventure," Baggins fervently wishes the wizard elsewhere. No such luck, however; soon 13 fortune-seeking dwarves have arrived on the hobbit's doorstep in search of a burglar, and before he can even grab his hat or an umbrella, Bilbo Baggins is swept out his door and into a dangerous adventure.

The dwarves' goal is to return to their ancestral home in the Lonely Mountains and reclaim a stolen fortune from the dragon Smaug. Along the way, they and their reluctant companion meet giant spiders, hostile elves, ravening wolves--and, most perilous of all, a subterranean creature named Gollum from whom Bilbo wins a magical ring in a riddling contest. It is from this life-or-death game in the dark that J.R.R. Tolkien's masterwork, The Lord of the Rings, would eventually spring. Though The Hobbit is lighter in tone than the trilogy that follows, it has, like Bilbo Baggins himself, unexpected iron at its core. Don't be fooled by its fairy-tale demeanor; this is very much a story for adults, though older children will enjoy it, too. By the time Bilbo returns to his comfortable hobbit-hole, he is a different person altogether, well primed for the bigger adventures to come--and so is the reader. --Alix Wilber

Lesson learned:

People are adaptable.

Link to review: click here

E-Reading: Book Review of #1 Sizzle in the City by Wendy Etherington

Name of Book: Sizzle in the City

Author: Wendy Etherington

ISBN: 9780373796892

Publisher: Harlequin Blaze

Part of a Series: Flirting with Justice

Type of book: Romance, royalty, loyalty, obedience, family, New York, 2012, cooking, adult

Year it was published: 2012

Summary:

With the help of her friends, caterer Shelby Dixon is taking justice into her own hands—she's going after the sleazebag who swindled her parents out of their life savings. It's a little vigilante, but hey…no one's perfect.That is, except the sleazebag's half brother.

Millionaire businessman Trevor Banfield is perfect. Perfect looks, perfect everything. And Shelby can't help herself from…well, helping herself. But mixing a sexy fling with revenge seems to be a recipe for disaster. Now she's torn between her taste for Trevor…and her thirst for righting wrongs!

Characters:

I found the characters to be real and genuine, although towards the end I didn't understand why Shelby had done what she had done. The characters stayed in their personalities and didn't deviate. Shelby is an independent and determined young woman who wants to get even, while Trevor is a tortured hero. (Pet peeve but why in Blaze romances are the heroes always players? Why not say they have healthy relationships that simply didn't work out at the time?) Trevor is drawn between family duty and supporting Shelby as well as trying to face what he fears. While Victoria was visible, we didn't get into her thoughts often enough and I can barely understand her character. Few times I did get into Calla's thoughts and also enjoyed the potential chemistry between her and Detective Antonio. I'm already looking forward to the next two books.

Theme:

Everything can turn out for the best. Its possible to live in a fairy tale.

Plot:

The story is written from third person narrative primarily from Trevor's, Shelby's and few times Calla's point of views. The book itself is well written and is replete with believable characters, strong pacing and action. I did feel that it lacked a little in the intimate scenes, but it more than made up with everything else.

Author Information:

Wendy Etherington was born and raised in the deep South-and she has fried-chicken recipes and Nascar ticket stubs to prove it. The author of more than twenty books, she writes full-time from her home in South Carolina, where she lives with her husband, two daughters, and an energetic shih tzu named Cody. She can be reached via her website www.wendyetherington.com.

Opinion:

I was surprised at how much I enjoyed the book and that I rooted for the hero and heroines. I had to admit that I didn't understand when they set up Max and so forth, but I found the book to be well-written and somehow believable. I think in third book titled Undone by Moonlight we have Calla and the detective that helped the women Antonio, but I wished to could have seen how Victoria met the guy from the second guy. The only thing that I felt was slightly lacking were the intimate scenes between hero and heroine. They were included, but they weren't well written as I had hoped. Other than that, stellar writing, interesting plot and well done characters that felt genuine.

4 out of 5
(0: Stay away unless a masochist 1: Good for insomnia 2: Horrible but readable; 3: Readable and quickly forgettable, 4: Good, enjoyable 5: Buy it, keep it and never let it go.)

Tuesday, September 4, 2012

Book Challenge A-Z #36 The Foreign Student by Susan Choi

Fulfilling the requirement:

The C letter for the author's last name alphabetically.

Summary:

Highly acclaimed by critics, The Foreign Student is the story of a young Korean man, scarred by war, and the deeply troubled daughter of a wealthy Southern American family. In 1955, a new student arrives at a small college in the Tennessee mountains. Chuck is shy, speaks English haltingly, and on the subject of his earlier life in Korea he will not speak at all. Then he meets Katherine, a beautiful and solitary young woman who, like Chuck, is haunted by some dark episode in her past. Without quite knowing why, these two outsiders are drawn together, each sensing in the other the possibility of salvation. Moving between the American South and South Korea, between an adolescent girl's sexual awakening and a young man’s nightmarish memories of war, The Foreign Student is a powerful and emotionally gripping work of fiction.

Lesson learned:

The road to love is fraught with multiple dangers.

Link to review: click here

Saturday, September 1, 2012

September 2012

Pride and Prejudice- Jane Austen
SR: May 29th, 2012
FR: N/A
The Song of the Lark-Willa Cather
SR: June 2nd, 2012
FR: N/A
The Foreign Student- Susan Choi
SR: May 28th, 2012
FR: September 4th, 2012
Vampire of the Mists- Christie Golden
SR: August 10th, 2012
FR: September 24th, 2012
The Music of Dolphins- Karen Hesse
SR: September 1st, 2012
FR: N/A
The Jungle Book (Great Illustrated Classics)- Rudyard Kipling
SR: August 1st, 2012
FR: September 18th, 2012
Prey- Lurlene McDaniel
SR: September 1st, 2012
FR: N/A
Bridge of Scarlet Leaves- Kristina Yoshida McMorris
SR: September 4th, 2012
FR: N/A
Witch- Christopher Pike
SR: September 1st, 2012
FR: September 30th, 2012
Chenxi and the Foreigner- Sally Rippin
SR: August 1st, 2012
FR: September 24th, 2021
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them- JK Rowling (Newt Scamander)
SR: September 1st, 2012
FR: N/A
Traitors- Kristie Kathryn Rusch
SR: August 1st, 2012
FR: September 19th, 2012
Heavy Sand- Anatoli Rybakov
SR: April 1st, 2012
FR: N/A
Ivanhoe- Sir Walter Scott
SR: February 1st, 2012
FR: N/A
Anna Karenina- Leo Tolstoy
SR: August 1st, 2012
FR: N/A

The Story of the Stone- Xueqin Cao
5. The Dreamer Wakes
SR: May 16th, 2012
FR: N/A
People Series Quartet- W Michael Gear and Kathleen O'Neal Gear
3. People of the Earth
SR: February 28th, 2012
FR: N/A
Storyteller Trilogy- Sue Harrison
2. Cry of the Wind
SR: May 7th, 2012
FR: N/A
The Angels Trilogy- Lurlene McDaniel
3. Until Angels Close My eyes
SR: July 31st 2012
FR: N/A
Harry Potter- JK Rowling
1. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
SR: September 1st, 2012
FR: N/A
Dragonlance Chronicles- Margaret Weis, Tracy Hickman
1. Dragons of Autumn Twilight
SR: August 1st, 2012
FR: N/A
Millicent Min Trilogy- Lisa Yee
3. So totally Emily Ebers
SR: August 14th, 2012
FR: N/A

Nonfiction:
The Fiddler on Pantico Run; An African Warrior, His White Descendants, Our Search for Family- Joe Mozingo
SR: September 25th, 2012
FR: N/A

E-reader:
Series:
Flirting with Justice- Wendy Etherington
1. Sizzle in the City
SR: August 29th, 2012
FR: September 12th, 2012
Blackfoot Warriors- Karen Kay
2. White Eagle's Touch
SR: September 29th, 2012
FR: N/A
Nancy Drew Series- Carolyn Keene
3. The Bungalow Mystery
SR: September 12th, 2012
FR: September 19th, 2012
Savage Series- Janelle Taylor
1. Savage Ecstasy
SR: September 24th, 2012
FR: September 29th, 2012
Sons of Chance- Vicki Lewis Thompson
1. Wanted!
SR: September 19th, 2012
FR: September 24th, 2012
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