Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Painting Juliana by Martha Louise Hunter Interview

Hey, sorry for the lateness, but here's my interview with the wonderful Martha Louise Hunter who wrote the memorable and unforgettable Painting Juliana.

1. What do you hope readers will take away from reading Painting Juliana?

That options are endless in our lives. We may tell ourselves that the time has passed to do something – whether it’s a passion that we’ve yet to follow, a mending a splintered relationship, or a healing a resentment – the truth is, it’s never too late.

2. What are your future projects?

I can’t decide upon a title, but I’m working on a PJ sequel/prequel while crafting a mystery about night terrors that includes a past-life element.

3. What were your favorite scenes from Painting Juliana?

When Juliana’s moving out of her house. So emotional that I not only cried and cried while writing it, but also while reading the upcoming audio version.

When Juliana lunches with her husband, Oliver at Sonny’s Steakhouse and he says he’s “a changed man.”

When Juliana finally meets the art dealer, Jan James and her father’s last painting is revealed.

When the funnel cloud from her childhood dream returns.

4. Any advice for aspiring writers?

First, don’t be afraid to be outrageous –  if you’re thinking an idea is too “out there,” it may be a sign that it belongs in the book! Secondly, play around with the sequence of your chapters. At which point your readers are presented with information can have a huge impact the telling of your story.

5. What are your favorite books or favorite writers and why?
My favorite book of all time is Barbara Kingsolver’s Poisonwood Bible is just a wow, multi-layered story. Her use of alternating narrators is a fascinating way of showing how a story is so very different from different characters’ perspectives.
Stephen King’s Dolores Clairborne is intense, unexpected, emotional, riveting – masterful. Anyone who thinks SK is just scary blood and guts is so wrong.

Anna Quinlen’s One True Thing is so memorable -- especially the face-to-face moment where the know-it-all daughter realizes that her mother isn’t the dummy she thought she was. 


Thanks once more! PS, I love Poisonwood Bible as well!  

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