Tuesday, December 22, 2015

G670 Book Review of The Prince of Prigs by Anthony Anglorus

Name of Book: The Prince of Prigs

Author: Anthony Anglorus

ISBN: 978-1-941072-20-2

Publisher: Self Published

Type of book: England, English Civil War of 17th Century, regicide, honor, 1648-1649, James Hind, pranks, creative escapes, cross dressing

Year it was published: 2015

Summary:

The union of England and Scotland under one crown is not even a half century old, and the Parliamentarians already threaten the very fabric of the nation. These are the adventures of highwayman Capt. James Hind who, in Robin Hood fashion, steals from the Roundheads to help fund the royalist cause. When Cromwell comes to power, James, the Prince of Prigs, must be careful whom among his treacherous “friends” he trusts.


Praise for Prince of Prigs:
Any who view historical fiction as dry or plodding should pick up The Prince of Prigs: it wraps courtroom drama, social issues, flamboyant personalities and British politics under one cover and represents a rollicking good read even for audiences who normally eschew the genre. As for those who know how compelling it can be - The Prince of Prigs is ample evidence of the powers of historical fiction. - D. Donovan, Midwest Book Review

Characters:

The only memorable character for me was James Hind and Moll. James Hind is a very creative and resourceful man who has a flair for dramatic and is honorable towards the lesser folk. Moll is James' companion and is an information gatherer. She often takes advantage of being a woman to get important information from them, and she also has a shop where she sells various goods. Unfortunately other characters weren't as rounded or memorable as those two.

Theme:

I am honestly not sure what the message was, all I know is that the book is pretty good entertainment for those who are familiar with English history.

Plot:

The story is in third person narrative from what seems to be everyone's point of view, which includes Captain James Hind, the King, Oliver Cromwell, and so forth. The book does have a preface which talks about James Hind, but the preface doesn't talk about the events of English Civil War in 17th century, nor the regicide of the King, which would have been important for those who are unfamiliar with this particular time period. Also because a lot of characters get their viewpoints in the story, asides from James Hind most had trouble imprinting in my mind.

Author Information:
(From HFVBT)

AMAZON US | AMAZON UK | BARNES & NOBLE | CHAPTERS | KOBO

Praise

“Any who view historical fiction as dry or plodding should pick up The Prince of Prigs: it wraps courtroom drama, social issues, flamboyant personalities and British politics under one cover and represents a rollicking good read even for audiences who normally eschew the genre. As for those who know how compelling it can be – The Prince of Prigs is ample evidence of the powers of historical fiction.” – D. Donovan, Midwest Book Review

About the Author03_Anthony Anglorus 1

After a lifetime of balancing books, Anthony turned his hand to writing them in 2009. His first book, The Other Robin Hood, is available as an ebook. An Englishman still living in England, he married a Russian doctor in 1999 and will be moving to rural France after reaching retirement age — but the writing will continue. He is already working on the sequel to The Prince of Prigs, tentatively titled Dark Days, Dark Deeds.

WEBSITE | TWITTER | GOODREADS



Opinion:

I'm sorry to say that I didn't really enjoy the story as I wanted to. I think perhaps its because I'm not really familiar with the time period of England that the author was talking about; (any chance that Alexandre Dumas' Twenty Years After covers it?) and I wasn't really certain of what was going on in the story and why some events unfolded as they have. I also had some difficulty distinguishing the characters from one another, or rather their roles in the story and which ones seemed to be the "good guys" and which ones were the "bad guys." Aside from that, the story has an addictive writing and a very memorable male character that has a very good heart. I think that this story is more suited for those who have a lot of familiarity with English history, and with that particular time period, because I was lost.

This is for HFVBT

Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, December 7
Guest Post at The Writing Desk
Thursday, December 10
Review at Diana’s Book Reviews
Monday, December 14
Review at Eclectic Ramblings of Author Heather Osborne
Monday, December 21
Interview at Historical Fiction Addicts
Tuesday, December 22
Review at Svetlana’s Reads and Views
Wednesday, December 23
Guest Post at One Book Shy of a Full Shelf
Monday, December 28
Guest Post at Historical Fiction Addicts
Tuesday, December 29
Review at Queen of All She Reads
Thursday, December 31
Tour Wrap-Up at Passages to the Past

3 out of 5
(0: Stay away unless a masochist 1: Good for insomnia 2: Horrible but readable; 3: Readable and quickly forgettable, 4: Good, enjoyable 5: Buy it, keep it and never let it go.)

No comments:

Post a Comment

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...